The Best Ways to Cook Spiralized Sweet Potato Noodles

The Best Ways to Cook Spiralized Sweet Potato Noodles

Since you all loved my post on the Three Best Ways to Cook Zucchini Noodles the other week, I figured I’d do another one and this time, I’ll be profiling sweet potato noodles!

Also, I’m back with a “What I Ate Today” video, because all of you were requesting them! I haven’t posted one in months, because I’ve been sharing the #EverydayInspiralized series on our YouTube channel.

But – we’re back!

Many of you have reached out to me saying that you’ve had dificult cooking sweet potato noodles. First off, make sure you’re getting the best noodles possible. How? Buy the Inspiralizer, of course. And remember, use code GREAT10 on your first purchase for 10% off!

Before I go over the three best ways to cook sweet potato noodles, here are some “best practices” for cooking those gorgeous orange noodles:

  • Unless you’re making sweet potato fries or something similar, peel the sweet potato before spiralizing. The outside skin of a sweet potato is tough, which means that when you go to spiralize, it makes the process itself a bit tougher (you have to spiralize more precisely and with more pressure.) The consistency for pasta is better when the sweet potato is peeled beforehand anyway. If you’re making sweet potato fries, keep the skin on – just use a bit more elbow grease. Which brings me to my next point….
  • Don’t be afraid to use pressure and force when spiralizing. I ran a spiralizing demo once and asked someone in the audience to try out the Inspiralizer with a sweet potato and the first thing I noticed was that they barely used any pressure. Sweet potatoes have a tough flesh, so if you don’t apply a good amount of pressure while spiralizing, it won’t work properly! Also, make sure you’re always using that side handle for leverage. To learn how to use the Inspiralizer properly, watch this video.
  • Use a non-stick skillet to cook the noodles – or use plenty of oil. If oyu’ve ever tried to cook sweet potato noodles and they’ve broken up in the pan, that’s probably due to two different things: 1) You could be grasping them too harshly with your pasta tongs – they’re veggies, be nice and gentle! and/or 2) You may be using a skillet without a non-stick coating, so the noodles are clinging to the pan and breaking. To avoid this, use a non-stick skillet or plenty of oil.
  • Choose the right sweet potato. Overripe sweet potatoes don’t spiralize well – they fall apart and the noodles become very brittle. To select a ripe sweet potato, which is kind of hard to do – just make sure it’s firm and doesn’t have many flaws in the skin (like dark spots.)

Now that you know best practices, here are the best ways that I recommend cooking spiralized sweet potato:


The Best Ways to Cook Spiralized Sweet Potato Noodles

Recipe example: Sweet Potato Noodles with Garlic Kale and Roasted Pork Chops

This is my favorite way to prepare sweet potato noodles. Place a skillet over medium-high heat, add in some olive oil and once the skillet is hot (flick water in, it should sizzle), add in the sweet potato noodles. Toss the sweet potato noodles lightly with pasta tongs and cook for for 5-7 minutes or until cooked through - don’t let the noodles cook for longer or else they’ll start to break apart. If you want to cook them more quickly, you can cover your skillet to let the steam cook the noodles, but this will cause the noodles to become slightly soggy and then, break apart. If you don’t mind a little breakage, this method is great!

Roast in the oven

The Best Ways to Cook Spiralized Sweet Potato Noodles

Recipe example: Foil Pouch Sweet Potato Noodle Chicken Fajitas

Roasting is an easy no-mess way to cook sweet potato noodles. You can use olive oil to add flavor, but you can also just spritz them with an olive oil mister or cooking spray, season to your preference and roast. To roast, set the oven to 425 degrees and cook for 10-12 minutes, depending on the size (which Blade) of the noodle. Sweet potato noodles roast well with other ingredients too, like here with my Mom’s Chicken over Root Veggies.

Cook separately and then stir into a soup (NEVER BOIL!)

The Best Ways to Cook Spiralized Sweet Potato Noodles

You should never boil your sweet potato noodles or simmer them too long in a soup. If you do, they’ll break up and won’t keep their noodle-like consistency. However, if you cook them first and then simply stir them into the liquid (ie with a curry or a soup), it’s a gentler cook and the noodles won’t break up.

Recipe example: Mexican Fideos Soup

Turn the noodles into rice

The Best Ways to Cook Spiralized Sweet Potato Noodles

Recipe example: Sweet Potato Rice Breakfast Bowl with Avocado

Bored with sweet potato noodles? Sweet potatoes make the BEST rice! To make the sweet potatoes into rice, watch this video. Once you have the rice, you can cook it in curries, soups, stews, chilis, or just saute it with some olive oil in a skillet and use it as the base of a rice dish, like with the above recipe. It takes about 5-7 minutes to cook sweet potato rice. To speed up the cooking process, add some moisture like with a 1/2 cup of veggie or chicken broth.

And if you want to see a sweet potato being spiralized, watch below:

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  1. YUM!

  2. When making rice, does spiralizing the veggie first add something to the texture, compared to just pulsing the veggie in a food processor?

    • ruth Detroit area :

      hi Kate – That was the same question I had some time ago. But since I tried pulsing ‘spiralized noodles’ in the food processor I’ll never go back! The reason for me is that the pcs are more uniform in size than when you just put chunks of a vegetable in the f.p. All different sizes are OK for soup, but if you want to plate it as ‘rice’, it cooks more uniformly (and looks better too)! ~ ruth

    • Yes, it makes them into the perfect rice width and texture! I’ve tried it with a grater or just pulsing cubes in a food processor and it doesn’t work as well!

  3. The spiralizer that they sell at Williams Sonoma, is this your brand? I really want to buy the spiralizer you created because my sister bought it and it works great.

  4. Wow, I didn’t even know that sweet potatoes could be overripe! That is very interesting! I will definitely keep that in mind when making sweet potato dishes, thank you :)

  5. where’s the recipe for that yummy looking bowl at the start of this post? it looks like spiralized sweet potato, brussels sprouts, and pomegranate seeds?

    p.s. i recently bought my own Inspiralizer, and just ordered one for my sister. love it.

  6. p.p.s. i recently heard that purple sweet potatoes are the (new) BOMB of superfoods. so i bought some: they’re much thinner than even the thinnest sweet potatoes, but i tried to pick some that looked at least as thick as a decent sized carrot. haven’t tried spiralizing them yet–anyone else? suggestions?

  7. Handle on Inspiralizer keeps coming off…even when doing zucchini. Fed up!

  8. Do these freeze well? Cooked or raw?


  1. […] may not have any issues with these ingredients, but if you do, you can swap out the zucchini for spiralized sweet potatoes, spaghetti squash or rice noodles if that works better for you. If spinach causes you problems, you […]

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