Ground Rules: Storing Spiralized Vegetable Noodles

Storing Zucchini Noodles and Other Types of Spiralized Veggie Noodles

Back to the lesson board! Today: “How to Spiralize & Store Noodles For the Week.

I often pronounce, “It’s so quick and easy to spiralize vegetables!” Having said that, I realize that I have the luxury of being 26, with no children to take care of nor a husband’s shoes to take off at the end of the day (although I do cook dinner for Lu when he gets home!). Plus, as you should know by now, I quit my job in June and am blogging  full time, trying to make the dream happen (updates coming soon!). Needless to say, I understand that “quick and easy” is a relative term.

Luckily, I once did work a 9-to-5 and know what it’s like to come home and not have the time or energy to prepare a meal. While working my previous job, I often struggled with the “Should I just order takeout?” when I got home at 7 or 8pm.

What’s the best way to avoid calling in somewhere last-minute and ordering “the usual” (which is probably unhealthy)? Preparing meals for the week on Sunday evening! Spiralized vegetables are quick to make, so you won’t be spending 4 hours “preparing” food. All you need is 30 seconds – 1 minute per vegetable, and you have one meal down. But how long can cut vegetables last?

How to Store Zucchini Noodles and Other Types of Spiralized Noodles

Well, I ran a little experiment. I prepared (as in spiralized) a few raw vegetables in advance to make for the week. Some I froze and some I refrigerated. Here are my results:

Frozen

  • Sweet Potato Noodles: Once defrosted (it takes 40 minutes), these noodles had wilted. In this form, after a quick pat down for excess water (there’s very little), they could be eaten raw and have a great noodle texture. Also, they heat up more quickly once they are defrosted – they only take about 2-3 minutes to cook.
  • Zucchini Noodles: Becomes a mushy wet mess, does not work. Once defrosted, the noodles are wilted, mushy, and in a cup of water.
  • Cucumber Noodles: Same as the zucchini noodles, they also lose some of their fresh flavor.
  • Butternut Squash Noodles: Like the sweet potato noodles, the butternut squash wilts and becomes easier to cook once it has been defrosted (it takes 25 minutes). Spiralizing in advance and freezing this type of noodle works!

Refrigerated

  • Sweet Potato Noodles: They become too brittle and hard and make it more difficult to cook in a skillet. According to this website, “It turns out that the vegetable contains an enzyme called demethylase. The enzyme normally lies dormant, but if the potato is subjected to temperatures below 55 degrees for a prolonged period, it kicks into gear.” That explains it.
  • Zucchini Noodles: This works very well, the noodles stay fresh. This is the method I frequently use when cooking many recipes per week. The noodles last about 5 days (perfect for the work week). Moisture builds up slightly, but nothing a little paper-towel-pat-down can’t fix.
  • Cucumber Noodles: Same as zucchini noodles, except they leak a bit more water. To prevent this, I patted down the noodles thoroughly prior to storing and that fixed the water issue. Shelf life is about 3-4 days, because of sogginess.
  • Butternut Squash Noodles: These noodles ideally hold up for no more than 5 days.

frozen zucchini noodles

The picture above is of the frozen zucchini noodle cube. Fail.

In summary…

  • Zucchini Noodles in an air-tight sealed container can last refrigerated for up to 5 days, but ideally 3-4 days.
  • Cucumber Noodles only can be stored in an air-tight sealed container in the refrigerator for about 2-3 days.
  • Sweet Potato & Butternut Squash Noodles can be frozen and will be wilted once defrosted, which is ideal for raw meals or quick cooking.
  • Butternut Squash Noodles keep fresh if refrigerated in an air-tight sealed container for up to 4 days.

Did this help? Do you have any other questions about preparing, cooking, eating, and storing zucchini noodles? I’m happy to help!

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Comments

  1. What about broccoli noodles? I have stalks left over from using the heads and was thinking of spiralizing and freezing them. I know they usually recommend blanching broccoli before freezing. Would I need to do this with the noodles?

  2. What about refrigerator pickling the noodles?

  3. Clayre Osier :

    I’m going to make Tuna Zucchini Noodle Casserole. After it is baked in the oven can it be frozen in small portions for another meal. I’m cooking for one.

  4. What about carrots how long will they last in the refrigerator

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  7. Hm this is surprising. I’ve been spiralizing a bunch of sweet potatoes and putting them in the fridge to cook later over the next week. I didn’t realize that freezer is ok but refrigerator breaks them down, I might have to rethink my process. I came to this page because I was wondering how long daikon could store in the fridge after being spiralized, I’ve never cooked with daikon before so I was more unsure about what to expect in terms of spiralizing in advance.

    By the way, thank you for your blog and work, discovering this tool and some of your recipes have revolutionized how I’ve thought about what to eat and how to eat/cook healthier! So Thanks!

    • Thank you so much for the kind words, Stephanie. We’re so happy that you’re finding the information that you need and that you’re enjoying our recipes!

  8. Has anyone tried blanching the zucchini noodles before freezing? Just wondering if this might work better

  9. For the salad recipe of zuchinni, tomatoes and avacado how long in advance can you make it. Can you do it the evening before a potluck or will it get soggy.? I thought maybe I could prep the items and mix when I arrive at the party?

  10. Nicole zimmerman :

    Thanks for this post I have so much zucchinni this summer I was wondering if they would be a huge fail in the freezer….maybe canning them maybe work? I could update you if you’d like.
    Thanks for this blog!
    -nicole

  11. Virginia Monson :

    What do we do in the winter, spring & most of the summer for noodles until these veggies are in season again?

    • Eat seasonally!!

    • I saw a great tip for freezing zucchini chunks: Blanche them in plain water. Lay them out on a cookie sheet lined with paper towels to drain, then remove the wet towel & put them on a silicon baking mat to freeze. The tip said adding salt made them loose flavor & texture. Great for soups & stews. I’m going to try that method with spiralized ones today. I bet it would work with strips too.

  12. I spirilizer zucchini noodles….put them in colander and salt them….let them weep for awhile….then bag and freeze them. They are not mushy when I salute them later.

  13. I dont care -about the freezing part – no longer than it takes to spiralize, i say just do it as you need them – Im not wanting to lose any of my Veggies- and , I dont want them watery- so i will be sprializing as I need them — I do think we need more help as to how to cook , or how to use after we get them all done for a meal– do you eat most of them raw – do you kinda fry-do you dunk in hot water for a minute?? of course Im talking about the veggies that you normally cook.

  14. Doris, if you go to the menu, then ‘getting started’ then ‘what can I spiralize’ it will provide a list of veggies you can use and upon clicking on the veg of your choice it will provide suggested cooking and serving methods. Hope this helps!

  15. Hi
    I love both squash and courgette sautéed in coconut oil for 4 minutes. Really good but only use a very little oil

Trackbacks

  1. […] For a guide on how to store and prepare spiralized noodles ahead of time, click here. […]

  2. […] a look at this post that explains how to prepare and store butternut squash, zucchini, cucumber and sweet potato […]

  3. […] 4. Chop or spiralize raw vegetables in advance. Too hangry to make dinner at the end of a long day? Cut veggies in bulk ahead of time to avoid wasting precious minutes chopping on busy weeknights. Zucchini noodles (“zoodles”) and butternut squash noodles will stay fresh in the fridge for 3-5 days, and chopped vegetables like carrots, onion and pepper will last a week when refrigerated properly in a sealed plastic bag or tupperware. Photo and tip: Ali / Inspiralized […]

  4. […] 4. Chop or spiralize tender vegetables in advance.Too hangry to make cooking during a finish of a prolonged day? Cut veggies in bulk forward of time to equivocate wasting changed mins chopping on bustling weeknights. Zucchini noodles (“zoodles”) and butternut squish noodles will stay uninformed in a fridge for 3-5 days, and chopped vegetables like carrots, onion and peppers will final a week when refrigerated scrupulously in a hermetic cosmetic bag or tupperware. Photo and tip: Ali / Inspiralized […]

  5. […] 4. Chop or spiralize raw vegetables in advance. Too hangry to make dinner at the end of a long day? Cut veggies in bulk ahead of time to avoid wasting precious minutes chopping on busy weeknights. Zucchini noodles (“zoodles”) and butternut squash noodles will stay fresh in the fridge for 3-5 days, and chopped vegetables like carrots, onion and pepper will last a week when refrigerated properly in a sealed plastic bag or tupperware. Photo and tip: Ali / Inspiralized […]

  6. […] Chopping and spiralizing vegetables doesn’t take up too much time. However, when you have a hectic schedule, tight deadlines, or even children to take care of, it can be an additional stress. With this simple method, you can avoid frustrations easily and speed up your dinnertime. All you have to do is 30 seconds per 1 vegetable and your meal is ready. Chop, spiralize, store, and relax. See how it’s done here. […]

  7. […] blog is really great for all things spiralized. The most helpful thing I’ve read from her is how to store spiralized veggies and how long they last. You can even freeze some kinds. And because some noodles last up to 5 days in fridge, you can just […]

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