How to Store Spiralized Vegetables for Meal Prep

How to Store Spiralized Vegetables

Here’s how to properly store zucchini noodles and other spiralized vegetables, including carrots, peppers, cabbage, and more. Use these tricks to perfect healthy meal prepped breakfasts, lunches and dinners at home. 

How to Store Spiralized Vegetables

Whether you’re meal prepping for a week of healthy lunches with your spiralizer or you’re making dinner and want leftovers for lunch tomorrow, it’s important to know the right way to store your cut vegetables.

Spiralizing is an incredibly useful hack for healthier meal prep. When you have bags of fresh spiralized zucchini, carrots, peppers, cabbage, parsnip, radishes, and more on hand, you always have a quick and easy way to add extra veggies to every meal.

This article covers everything you need to know about how to store your spiralized vegetables for maximum freshness.

Read on for the details on:

  • Spiralizing for Meal Prep
  • Spiralized Meals That Work Best for Meal Prep
  • Meal Prepping with Zucchini Noodles
  • Some Meal Prep-Friendly Recipes to Get You Started

How to Use Spiralized Vegetables for Meal Prep

Meal prepping with spiralized veggies is a great way to commit to a healthy week and get extra veggies into every meal!

Here are the general guidelines for the most common spiralizable veggies and fruit:

Spiralized Apples

Raw Storage: Cut apples instantly brown in the refrigerator. To prevent this, seal apple noodles tightly in a Ziploc or airtight container (try to avoid letting much air in).

Store cut apples for 1-2 days  in the refrigerator.

Beet Noodles

Raw Storage: Seal cut beets in an airtight container or up to 5 days in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Bell Pepper

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.

Storing Spiralized Broccoli

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Butternut Squash Noodles

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Spiarlized Cabbage

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Carrot Noodle Storage

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 1.5 weeks in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Celeriac

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Chayote

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container over paper towels or napkins for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Do not freeze chayote noodles.

Cucumber

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container over paper towels or napkins for up to 2 days in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Do not freeze cucumber noodles.

Daikon

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 10 days in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Do not freeze daikon noodles.

Jicama

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 1 week in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Do not freeze jicama noodles.

Kohlrabi

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days in the refrigerator.

Spiralized Onion

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 4 days in the refrigerator.

Parsnip Noodles

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 10 days in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Spiralized Plantain

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 4 days in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Rutabaga

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 1 week in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Sweet Potato Noodles and Rice

Raw Storage: Place in a bowl, cover with water, cover and store for up to 2 days.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Turnip Noodles and Rice

Raw Storage: Store in an airtight container for up to 1 week in the refrigerator.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

White Potato

Raw Storage: Place in a bowl, cover with water, cover and store for up to 2 days in the fridge.

Frozen: Store in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Spiralized Zucchini & Summer Squash

Storage: Seal in an airtight container, lasts up to 5 days in the refrigerator

Frozen: Do not freeze zucchini and summer squash noodles.

Best Spiralizer Recipes for Meal Prep

You can use spiralized vegetables to prep a full meal, or multiple meals in big batches.

These are the best kinds of recipes to use spiralized vegetables for meal prep:

  • “Raw”/cold dishes: If the recipe requires no cooking or is better served chilled, it’s a win-win! Prep the dish and store it in an airtight container in the fridge for as long as the raw components can be stored, according to the examples above.

 

  • Spiralized rice: many vegetable rice dishes tend to have drier vegetables like sweet potato and parsnips, they’re perfect for prepping in advance and reheating. They also can be frozen easily.

 

  • Non-zucchini noodle dishes with ragu-type sauces: If you’re making a bolognese over sweet potato noodles, this can easily be reheated and enjoyed. However, if you’re making a zucchini noodle dish with a bolognese, the water in the zucchini noodles will thin out the sauce and dilute its originally delicious flavor the longer it’s stored. Opt for starchier, firmer noodles for heavier sauces. You can also store the sauce and noodles separately to prevent any wilting.

 

One Pot Basque Chicken with Spiralized Potatoes in a bowl

  • Dishes with no sauce: If your recipe doesn’t call for a heavy sauce, that’s perfect. It will reheat well. Bonus points for recipes with cheese! Reheated cheese will melt nicely into the noodles and absorb excess moisture. This works with zucchini noodles too!

 

  • Pesto pasta: Pesto sauces work well with all vegetables and reheat well. Actually, the olive oil in the pesto works to our advantage with zucchini noodles. Throw in some kale, spinach or another vegetable that will absorb excess moisture, and you’ve got a pesto pasta, fit for lunch!

 

  • Noodle dishes or soups without zoodles: If you make a big batch of a spiralized noodle bowl or soup, you can definitely reheat it for lunch. That is, unless it includes zucchini noodles. I don’t recommend reheating zucchini noodles in soup, as they will dilute the dish. If you’re not concerned about losing some of the flavor in your soup, however, give it a try. You can always re-season the broth when you reheat.

 

 

 

  • Casseroles: If you love a comforting, hearty lunch, then you’re in luck: non-zucchini noodle casseroles work fabulously when reheated. You can reheat in the microwave or store in the baking dish and reheat in the oven.

chipotle sweet potato noodle salad with roasted corn

How to Meal Prep with Spiralized Zucchini

Please note: spiralized zucchini should not be frozen. When you go to defrost it, it will wilt and become a mushy mess.

It can be tricky to prepare a zucchini noodle dish in advance due to the vegetable’s high water content. The longer the zucchini sits in a sauce, the more moisture releases and the more watery/mushy the dish will get. This applies for cucumbers as well.

But if you’re saving leftovers from a spiralized dish that includes zucchini noodles, here are a few tips to prevent some of that sogginess:

1. Save Some Extra Sauce

While cooking, if you know you’re going to save leftovers, remove some of the sauce from your pot and save it in a container in the fridge.

Then, the next day, heat up the reserved sauce, cook fresh zucchini noodles, pour the sauce over and dig in!

For example, you could make a big batch of Gluten-Free Turkey Meatballs with Zucchini Noodles for dinner. Reserve a serving of the tomato sauce and meatballs. Then reheat the sauce & meatballs at lunchtime the next day. While the sauce and meatballs heat up, cook fresh zucchini noodles in a skillet. Finally, add the sauce and meatballs to the zucchini and dig in.

Fire Roasted Tomato Zucchini Pasta with Turkey Meatballs

2. Make it Raw

I have many recipes for yummy no-cook meals with spiralized zucchini and other vegetables. These can be saved in the refrigerator for later and don’t require reheating. Therefor, the noodles won’t release too much water.

Try it out with this summery recipe for Avocado and Tomato Zucchini Noodle Salad with Basil Vinaigrette. Just remember to add the dressing just before serving!

3. Add extra seasonings to your soup

If you just made a big batch of delicious zucchini noodle soup for meal prep, like the Minestrone from Inspiralize Everything or this Bacon and White Bean Zoodle Soup, here’s a tip: pack extra seasonings.

As the zucchini sits in the soup, its moisture will dilute the broth, making your meal less flavorful. To account for this, just before serving, add an extra dash of salt, dried herbs, hot sauce, or other seasonings that make sense for the recipe.

The best meal-prep recipes for spiralized vegetables

Get started meal planning with these easy-to-store recipes:

Easy Meal Plans for your Spiarlizer

If you’d like us to do the work for you, we’ve got you covered! Check out our Spiralized Meal Plans, here.

Happy, healthy planning!

Inspiralizer

And for your easy access, I’ve created a FREE resource with everything you need to know about the most common spiralizable vegetables, including:

  • How to prepare each vegetable with the Inspiralizer
  • How to cook vegetable noodles and rice
  • The best ways to serve each vegetable
  • Which blade works best
  • How best to store the vegetables for meal prep and planning (including which vegetable noodles can be frozen)

Click here for my master guide to spirilizing vegetables

Which spiralized vegetables work best for prepared lunches?

You can make healthy and delicious meal prepped lunches with nearly any spiralized vegetable.

Use these tips to ensure your vegetable noodles are crisp and fresh at lunchtime:

  • Zucchini & Cucumbers: store the noodles separate from any sauce or dressing. By separating, you avoid excess moisture building up and making a soggy mess. If you really want to use zucchini noodles, try adding elements that will soak up that moisture (like leafy greens, cheese, breadcrumbs or regular pasta)
  • Apples & Pears: fruits brown quickly and lose their crispness. So unless you’re planning on eating the meal that day or you don’t mind a little browning and soft fruit noodles, avoid spiralizing these in advance.
  • Kohlrabi, Jicama, Daikon Radishes: if you’re using these raw, note that they snap easily when packed tightly.
  • Beets: Beets can be messy when they’re raw. They’re a little more manageable when they’re cooked, but plan accordingly (wouldn’t want to ruin your slacks or a crisp white blouse at your desk with beet noodles!)
  • Butternut Squash: Butternut squash tends to over-soften quickly when cooked. When stored, your lunch may be a little softer than you expect if you’re eating butternut squash noodles.

General Spiralizer Meal Prep Tips & Tricks

Here’s a quick cheat-sheet of the best vegetable noodles to store raw and cooked to help you perfect meal prep every week.

    • Best Spiralized Veggies to Store Raw:
      • Zucchini (separated from sauce/dressing)
      • Cucumber (separated from sauce/dressing)
      • Onion
      • Chayote
      • Kohlrabi
      • Jicama
      • Carrot
    • Best Spiralized Veggies to Store Cooked:
      • Potatoes (all kind)
      • Parsnip
      • Rutabaga
      • Kohlrabi
      • Daikon Radish
      • Celeriac
      • Carrot
      • Broccoli stem

What are the best containers for storing spiralized lunches?

The number one rule is that your container for storing spiralizer meal prep should be airtight! I like to buy a pack of containers that come in various sizes so that I have options, depending on the type of meal I’m making. This Rubbermaid set has all types of sizes, perfect for packaging spiralized veggies, dressings, and sauces.

Meal Prep Lunch Recipe Roundup

If you’re still stumped, I’ve created a Pinterest board full of all of my recipes that can be cooked in advance and reheated for lunch (or dinner!) Click the image below to access the Pinterest board:

Inspiralized Meals for Lunch Meal Planning

Inspiralized

How to Store Zucchini Noodles and Spiralized Vegetables

New to spiralizing? Grab your FREE eBook with our 20 Most Popular Blog Recipes!

Have a spiralizer and not sure where to start?How about making our fool-proof, most popularly made recipes from the blog? In this printable PDF eCookbook you’ll find photos and full recipes of our readers’ favorites to get you started!

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173 comments

Now I am going to do my breakfast, once having my breakfast coming over again to read additional news.
Rachel says:
Just for clarity... when you defrost things, did you just set them out on the counter? Or defrost in the microwave? 40 min. seems like a long time for the microwave but I didn't want to assume with the Frozen Swoodles!
Amanda says:
Thanks! Very helpful.
Lauren says:
Super helpful - thank you!
Hi there,I log on to your new stuff named "Ground Rules: Spiralizing & Storing Noodles — Inspiralized" regularly.Your humoristic style is awesome, keep doing what you're doing! And you can look our website about powerful love spells.
Ana Perry says:
have you tried cooking the zucchini noodles before freezing? Not knowing you shouldn't freeze them i cooked our meal and put left overs in the freezer for lunches. I don't remember them being mushy or actually much unlike fresh. I'd like to know if you try it. I hope it wasn't a fluke.
Anonymous says:
Yes this was quite helpful! Saved me from another kitchen fail :)
Joanna says:
Have you tried to dehyrate them in a dehydrator or oven? I'm going to be trying that this week to preserve some zucchini & summer squash noodle.
Amber says:
Personally I'm not big on dehydrated zucchini. About the only way I can think of to use them afterward is to add the dehydrated noodles to a pot of soup to rehydrate in there
Joanna says:
I am planning on making some z-noodles to use as lasagna. This will be my first attempt at dehydrating anything.
Linda says:
Joanna, I am very interested to find out how this worked for you. Please let us know. I am hoping to do some dehydrating so I can use different veggies through the winter.
cora says:
Thanks for the post! What I do with my cut vegetables is to use a mason jar, put a paper towel at the bottom, add the vegetable, add another paper towel, add more vegetable and then top with another paper towel and put on the mason jar lid. Works like a charm. Some vegetables, like onions will last over a week.
Meaghan says:
Thank you for sharing, Cora!
Kit says:
Never heard of sweet potato noodles most seen and eaten zucchini ones and knew acorn squash existed Came to find storing techniques going to try making sweet potato ones
Meaghan says:
You must!! They will change the game.
KIM JONES says:
My usual go-to meal in a hurry is ramen noodles. Thank you for doing the experiments, so I can try preparing in advance, and replace the ramen with something healthy!
Meaghan says:
Of course! You're so welcome!
Britishblueeyes says:
You can probably kill the brittle issue of sweet potato noodles by storing them in a plastic deli container in water. They should last about 5 days in the fridge that way and stay nice and fresh! I would try the same for celery, carrots and butternut squash. You might want to change the water and get them to last even a little longer.
Anonymous says:
Great post thanks. I have been looking into freezing zoodles, and I came across an article that said after you zoodle your zucchini if you put them into a mesh strainer sprinkle them with salt, let them sit for 20-30 minutes letting the moisture drip out that they freeze pretty well. I would need to try it, I thought I would post maybe someone has already tried this method? Great blog.
Meaghan says:
Check out this post! It's all about the best storing methods for each veggie noodle: https://inspiralized.com/meal-prep-with-spiralized-vegetables/
Christie says:
Has anyone tried this method for zucchini noodles yet? "put them into a mesh strainer sprinkle them with salt, let them sit for 20-30 minutes letting the moisture drip out that they freeze pretty well." I saw it posted above but didn't know if it was tried by anyone yet?
Anonymous says:
I have frozen mine in a food saver bag. Thaw in strainer then Saute
Gwen says:
I tried the salt and spiralized zucchini and still ended up with a wet mess after freezing ?
JJ says:
This page https://onceamonthmeals.com/recipes/zoodles-spaghetti-style-noodles/ has *great* information on freezing zucchini noodles. I haven't tried it yet, but I'm pretty confident in it -- make sure you look at the comment about blanching the noodles, too! In summary, it's: - Make the zoodles - Lay in a single layer and sprinkle with 1T salt. Let sit 30 mins. - Turn them over and sprinkle with 1T salt. Let set 30 mins. - Pat dry with paper towel - Blanch (which means, drop in boiling water for 60 seconds) - Let cool, pat dry, flash freeze (in a single layer on a baking sheet) and then put in whatever freezer container you like. Is that a heck of a lot of work? Yes. Is it potentially worth it if you're freezer cooking a few weeks' worth of meals? I think so.
Tia says:
Hi ! I'm new to this way of cooking. I find it fun and easy BUT after I spiralize zucchini or squash and set it aside in the strainer. I find it limp and wet. What happened to the crisp? I sad with my results and want to give up.
Meaghan says:
Hi Tia! Don't give up! We have a super handy video that covers avoiding watery zucchini noodles that might help: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mILFcumUbuk&t=39s
Kathleen says:
Link does not work. Returns "nothing found" or some such.
Anonymous says:
Daikon radish noodles can be frozen w no prep and last for months!
Anonymous says:
It would be nice if the National Center for Food Preservation addressed freezing spiralized veggies. They are at: http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/freeze.html The thing that worries me about this blog is the lack of blanching. Better information is needed about blanching times in regards to freezing veggies this way, for safety. I'd love to put up a lot of a lot of zucchini noodles for the winter, when have zucchini growing in the garden, but would like to know am doing it safely.
sayur says:
I got this site from my friend who informed me about this web page and at the moment this time I am visiting this website and reading very informative articles or reviews at this time.
keygoddess says:
I love all the information provided here on your page and I subscribe to your youtube channel. My only problem here is that I get all the way to the bottom of the page and it is still not finished loading. It even gave me a crash message early on. I know you must include ads to support your page, but with my Chrome browser it has still not finished loading. Some of the ads may not even be seen due to the long load time. All that said, you have a great youtube channel and give excellent info on spiralizing. Keep up the good work and thank you for your insights.

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